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10 February 2015
 February 10, 2015
Most personal injury damages are classified as “compensatory,” meaning that they are intended to compensate the injured plaintiff for what was lost due to the accident or injury.
A compensatory damages award is meant to make the injured plaintiff “whole” again from a monetary standpoint (to the extent that’s possible). This means trying to put a dollar figure on all the consequences of an accident. Some compensatory damages are relatively easy to quantify — like reimbursement for property damage and medical bills.
But it’s harder to place a monetary value on pain and suffering or the inability to enjoy hobbies because of physical limitations caused by lingering accident-related injuries.

Here’s a rundown of the different types of compensatory damages that are common in many personal injury cases.

 

Medical treatment. A personal injury damages award almost always includes the cost of medical care associated with the accident — reimbursement for treatment you’ve already received and compensation for the estimated cost of medical care you’ll need in the future because of the accident.

 

Income. You may be entitled to compensation for the accident’s impact on your salary and wages — not just income you’ve already lost but also the money you would have been able to make in the future, were it not for the accident. In personal injury legalese, a damage award based on future income is characterized as compensation for an accident victim’s “loss of earning capacity.”

 

Property loss. If any vehicles, clothing, or other items were damaged as a result of the accident, you’ll likely be entitled to reimbursement for repairs or compensation for the fair market value of the property that was lost.

 

Pain and suffering. You may be entitled to get compensation for pain and serious discomfort you suffered during the accident and in its immediate aftermath — also for any ongoing pain that can be attributed to the accident.

How Much is a Personal Injury Case Worth?

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